The Importance of a Code of Conduct at Your Club

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Many of us work with, around or for private clubs. Our workplaces generally elicit thoughts of a peaceful, serene and calming environment. Fortunately, most of the time this is an accurate portrayal of Private Clubs. Occasionally however, and particularly around our athletic and dining amenities, the emotions of a member can result in words or actions which not only are inconsistent with our expectations, but can also cause distress among other members. Along with some other club industry executives, I was recently asked to provide some thoughts around the importance of clubs having a clearly defined code of behavior, as well as the enforcement of a code. #CMAA CEO Jeff Morgan is quoted in the article on the importance of transparency when setting expectations and overall I think the author John Torsiello, did an excellent job. The suggestions offered are all practical and easily implemented. As the saying goes, "an ounce of prevention..." The article appears in this month's Tennis Industry Magazine. I hope you enjoy the read!

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We are all in the hospitality business

F. H. Benzakour, CCM CCE is Chief Operating Officer and General Manager at Edgewood Country Club in River Vale, NJ. I recently purchased and read his new book, 12 Golden Keys To Hospitality Excellence. We all know how important traditional continuing education is, however sometimes it’s refreshing to sit peacefully and read first hand how someone else approaches the daily challenges which we all face. F.H. came to the United States from another country, as I did and I enjoyed that his perspective towards hospitality is both optimistic and practical. If interested, F.H’s book can be purchased here from Amazon. To purchase this publication on Amazon, Click Here.


Teaching Professional Trade Associations Offer Job Boards

The two major tennis and racquet sports teaching and professional trade associations, the U.S. Professional Tennis Association (www.uspta.com) and the Professional Tennis Registry (www.ptrtennis.org) have made practical and relevant enhancements to their job-posting sites in recent years. The enhancements have been driven I suspect by both a desire to improve services for their respective memberships, as well as the emergence of so many for-profit job board sites.

Both USPTA and PTR provide clubs, club managers and search committees with job-listing services at no cost, and these listings have the potential to reach a broad range of pros who are actively searching for a new position. USPTA also has some excellent articles and How To Hire resources that are designed to help with the hiring process, however neither of the groups offer specific counsel on your search process.

More critical to keep in mind with your decision to only list your open position on an association job board, is to remain mindful that your posting will only be seen by professionals who are scanning the respective job board and actively looking for a new position.

McMahon Tennis Search broadens the reach of your position posting while concurrently targeting and recruiting specific professionals who are suitably qualified and positioned in their career for you to consider.